Reblogged from: Magna Publications: http://www.magnapubs.com/blog/teaching-and-learning/helping-students-more-accurately-assess-their-performance/

Excerpt:
We can and should help students more accurately assess their performance in a course, but Paul Van Auken (referenced in another article in this issue of the newsletter) makes a point not to be forgotten in this discussion: “Students need to be engaged—put in the time and effort, be interested in the material, actively participate in class activities, be intellectually excited about projects—and take responsibility for learning.” (p. 213) As teachers we have the responsibility to do all we can to positively influence the decisions students make about learning. But we can’t make those decisions for them. Learning, whether it’s learning content or learning about learning, is a student responsibility.

Read more here: http://www.magnapubs.com/blog/teaching-and-learning/helping-students-more-accurately-assess-their-performance/

Reblogged from:
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http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/learning-edge-classroom-activities-promoting-deep-learning/?ET=facultyfocus:e86:119382a:&st=email

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See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/learning-edge-classroom-activities-promoting-deep-learning/?ET=facultyfocus:e86:119382a:&st=email#sthash.xbxoQTJF.dpuf

Lead by Doing, Not by Delegating

Posted: July 28, 2014 by broadyesl in leadership

Many leaders try hard to effectively delegate in order to avoid micro managing their organizations. This reading makes a case for staying between both extremes for full return. Excerpt:

Delegating difficult issues is tempting, but it can only lead to disappointment. Leaders shouldn’t assume that all projects can be assigned to others in the same manner. Day-to-day operational work is safely delegated using the traditional methods of assigning accountability, establishing target outcomes, and monitoring progress. But strategic, change-oriented initiatives require hands-on leadership by senior executives who have the passion, perspective, and power to pull it off.

In this instance, executives must truly be leaders, rather than just sponsors. Sponsorship is a watered-down version of leadership, hallmarked by monthly attendance at well-scripted steering committee meetings. Leadership of hard problems is a hands-on, roll-up-your-sleeves, messy job—a set of skills often left behind as executives move up the organizational food chain and away from the day-to-day work routine.

Reblogged from and link found: http://www.strategy-business.com/blog/Lead-by-Doing-Not-by-Delegating

Teaching Writing with Google Drive

Posted: July 28, 2014 by broadyesl in Uncategorized

4 Tips for Flipped Learning

Posted: July 28, 2014 by broadyesl in flipping the class

Reblogged from Edutopia: http://www.edutopia.org/blog/4-tips-for-flipped-learning-joe-hirsch?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=post&utm_campaign=blog-4-tips-flipped-learning-link

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What aspects are involved in flipping the classroom? And what do you do in order to flip them? A short discussion in this article. Something to get readers started to find more information later…

3 Ways to Prepare for Diverse Learners

Posted: July 28, 2014 by broadyesl in special needs

Edutopia

3 Ways to Prepare for Diverse Learners: http://edut.to/1t4HgiP.

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