From one of my graduate students:

I used a very easy app called 30hands. In the app, I just save and upload the pictures from my  camera roll. There is an option to record your voice over each slide/picture. At the end, you simply save it to the camera roll as a complete video. I use this often in my class. They can complete an entire project in one class period with this app. Also, since it is on their camera roll, students can immediately upload it to my school website/app- schoology. From there, I can play them for the class to see.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/30hands-create-show-what-you/id605013231?mt=8

School Policies Regulating Digital Safety

Posted: April 16, 2015 by broadyesl in digital safety

Read “5 ways to create a safer digital environment at your school” at

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/04/15/safer-digital-environment-711/

Read “Kindergarteners Who Share iPads Score Higher on Achievement Tests”  at http://neuronetlearning.com/blog/kindergarteners-who-share-ipads-score-higher-on-achievement-tests/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=kindergarteners-who-share-ipads-score-higher-on-achievement-tests

And the answer is -drumroll- yes!

Excerpt:

The researcher found that kindergartners who share iPads with their classmates significantly outscore their peers on achievements tests compared to kindergarten classrooms with no iPads or classes with iPads for each student.

Professors and Teaching Pedagogy

Posted: April 15, 2015 by broadyesl in professors

An interesting topic for higher education faculty members examining discipline-based pedagogy approaches as well as educational research overall.  Read “Pedagogical Knowledge: Three Worlds Apart” in http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/pedagogical-knowledge-three-worlds-apart/

Read and watch a video to see how teachers use NMinecraft to boost learning:  http://www.theguardian.com/global/2015/apr/07/three-ways-minecraft-classroom

Excerpt:

Just a few years ago, the Massive Open Online Course was expected to reinvent higher education. Millions of people were signing up to watch Web-based, video lectures from the world’s great universities. Some were completing real assignments, earning certificates and forming virtual study groups — all for free.

Surely the traditional college degree would instantly collapse.

Today, much of that hype has subsided (though best-selling authors and newspaper columnists are still making the case that “the end of college” is nigh). And new research on 1.7 million MOOC participants offers a more nuanced view of just what these courses are and could become.

Read more here:  http://www.npr.org/blogs/ed/2015/04/11/397295495/the-future-of-free-online-courses-new-research-from-mit-and-harvard

Professors: Student Attitude Towards Office Hours

Posted: April 13, 2015 by broadyesl in professors

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