Archive for the ‘professional development’ Category

Micro-credentials making it into the mainstream.  Read more at  https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-10-05-more-colleges-are-offering-microcredentials-and-developing-them-the-way-businesses-make-new-products

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Awesome free training that can be done in a short time at https://edutrainingcenter.withgoogle.com/training


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Excerpt:

Professional development programs are based on different theories of how students learn and different theories of how teachers learn. Reviewers often sort programs according to design features such as program duration, intensity, or the use of specific techniques such as coaches or online lessons, but these categories do not illuminate the programs’ underlying purpose or premises about teaching and teacher learning. This review sorts programs according to their underlying theories of action, which include (a) a main idea that teachers should learn and (b) a strategy for helping teachers enact that idea within their own ongoing systems of practice. Using rigorous research design standards, the review identifies 28 studies. Because studies differ in multiple ways, the review presents program effects graphically rather than statistically. Visual patterns suggest that many popular design features are not associated with program effectiveness. Furthermore, different main ideas are not differentially effective. However, the pedagogies used to facilitate enactment differ in their effectiveness. Finally, the review addresses the question of research design for studies of professional development and suggests that some widely favored research designs might adversely affect study outcomes.

Download at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.3102/0034654315626800?utm_source=Adestra&utm_medium=email&utm_content=How%20Does%20Professional%20Development%20Improve%20Teaching%3F&utm_campaign=7JA252&utm_term=

What is it and what can it do? Microcredentials are a great new way to approach skill acquisition without earning degrees or certification.  Read more in this publication: Customizing Professional Development Through Microcredentials at http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2017/04/26/customizing-professional-development-through-microcredentials.html

Excerpt:

A recent survey reported in the UK newspaper The Telegraph stated that as many as half of the teachers consulted for the survey said they rarely use technology in the classroom.

I am convinced a survey among professors would yield the same outcome.

Red the reasons why this is the case.

 

 

 

https://edex.adobe.com/connected

Excerpt:

Adobe has committed over $300 million in software and professional development services to the White House’s ConnectED initiative. As part of this $2 billion+ effort from the private sector, Adobe will deliver creative tools and teacher professional development to schools across the United States—all with the goal of helping youth express their creativity and build their skills for future success.

Adobe’s donation includes:

In addition, Adobe is providing a range of teacher training resources from the Adobe Education Exchange and Adobe Youth Voices.

Adobe can now support district-wide programs by streamlining the school application and software deployment process. For more information, see the FAQ.

 

Important implications for professional development and training and for creating professional learning communities from a research study.  Excerpt:

When it came to final grades, students who received the peer rationale scored an average of 92 percent — significantly higher than the 86 percent scored by students who received the rationale from the instructor. Interestingly, students who received no rationale averaged 90 percent for a final grade, which is still higher than those who received the instructor rationale.

“We found that receiving the instructor rationale led to lower final grades than both the peer rationale and no rationale conditions,” Roseth said. “This gives support to the idea that, motivationally, the fact that instructors control grades, tell the students what do to, and so on, may be working against their efforts to increase their students’ appreciation of why the class is important.”

Source:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170321110341.htm