Archive for the ‘note-taking’ Category

Maybe the old-fashioned way. Read more in In The Age Of Screen Time, Is Paper Dead? at http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2017/09/10/544546911/in-the-age-of-screen-time-is-paper-dead

Excerpt:

Here are just a few of the fun facts and findings:

  • 96 percent of parents think that paper is “an essential part of children being able to achieve their educational goals.”
  • Among junior high and high school students, 70 percent prepare for tests by taking handwritten class notes, and 60 percent make and use flashcards.
  • 50 percent of seventh- and eighth-graders agree they “learn information best if they write it down by hand.”
  • College students like paper, too: 81 percent, for example, say they always or often use paper tools to prepare for exams.

So there you go — an (admittedly promotional) plug for good old paper. It’s also a reminder of how pervasive paper remains in schools today, and it’s not just the paper industry saying it.

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I am truly surprised by the findings of this study! For the longest time I learned that using word processing creates deeper learning. Read for yourself and comment on what you know about this topic: http://www.vox.com/2014/6/4/5776804/note-taking-by-hand-versus-laptop?utm_name=share-button&utm_content=buffer8927c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Note-taking Tips: Identifying Important Info

Posted: 06/05/2014 by broadyesl in note-taking

teachingwithedtech

2014-05-04_1524

As they commence their faculty life, my students currently studying English at the Foundations Development Year (FDY) at Sabanci University, Istanbul will attend countless lectures delivered in English. For this reason, my colleagues and I at FDY train and assess our students on lecture note-taking skills as a preparation for their faculty life. The lectures they listen to are usually around 20 minute long at CEFR C1. They contain typical lecture features such as setting the scene, outlining the lecture, repeating important information, emphasizing significant ideas, using signposting language, giving examples, and drawing the lecture to a close, etc.

One of my observations in class is that most of the students are not really aware of how to take notes efficiently. To me, taking notes efficiently means identifying the important ideas. How can we show them what is important to take notes? I prepared this infographic below as visuals can…

View original post 89 more words

http://goo.gl/0LxrP9

20 Awesome BYOD and Mobile Learning Apps

Posted: 12/02/2014 by broadyesl in apps, note-taking

From:  Edutopia:

link

Note-taking ones and more