Archive for the ‘leadership’ Category

Understanding Your Team

Posted: 01/08/2017 by broadyesl in leadership, Uncategorized

Practical reading in HOW TO RESPOND WITH GRACE AND RESOLVE WHEN TEAMMATES DISENGAGE at https://leadershipfreak.blog/2016/12/07/how-to-respond-with-grace-and-resolve-when-teammates-disengage/

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Read Within your control: The habits of likable leaders at https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/04/within-your-control-the-habits-of-likeable-leaders?utm_content=bufferd040f&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Here is the short list:

1. They Form Personal Connections

2. They’re Approachable

3. They’re Humble

4. They’re Positive

5. They’re Even-Keeled

6. They’re Generous

7. They Demonstrate Integrity

8. They Read People Like A Book

9. They Appreciate Potential

Source: https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/04/08/opinion/sunday/the-utter-uselessness-of-job-interviews.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share&referer=http://m.facebook.com

Interesting discussion about interview observations…

 

Source:  https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/02/the-best-bosses-know-when-to-lead-like-a-chimp?utm_content=buffer96f5c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm

_campaign=buffer

Interesting discussion

 

Source: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/02/heres-how-to-effectively-deal-with-difficult-people?utm_content=buffer2b1ee&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

 

Collaboration and Networking

Posted: 05/04/2017 by broadyesl in leadership, networking, Uncategorized

Good networkers have the best foundation for good collaborators.  Teach the kids how to relate to others!  Read 11 Habits The Best Networkers Have at http://www3.forbes.com/leadership/11-habits-the-best-networkers-have/?utm_campaign=habits-best-networkers-have-mbl&utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=referral

Find here a report of a survey:  http://www.academicworkforce.org/CAW_portrait_2012.pdf

Excerpt:

Some 42 percent of adjuncts said their primary “value add” in the classroom was their nonacademic professional experience, and 68 percent said they had a career outside of education before they started teaching. About half (55 percent) currently hold some other job than teaching. That’s the finding with which adjunct advocates are most likely to quibble, since many have argued that the traditional definition of an adjunct as someone who teaches “on the side” of some other career is dangerously outdated. A major 2012 report on adjuncts from the Coalition on Academic Workforce, for example, said that more than 75 percent of respondents in its own study “sought, are now seeking or will be seeking a full-time tenure-track position, and nearly three-quarters said they would definitely or probably accept a full-time tenure-track position at the institution at which they were currently teaching if such a position were offered.”